Tax - Accounting - Business Advice


Tax Alerts

One of the smaller frustrations of dealing with the federal government is that personal information provided by an individual to any one government department is not shared with or communicated with other branches of the government. The intention behind that policy is a good one – it’s there to protect the privacy of the individual. However, it also means that a single individual must contact potentially several government departments, or log on to several websites in order to, for instance, arrange for direct deposit, or to provide updated information – like a change in bank account information.

The early months of the new calendar year can feel like a never-ending series of bills and other financial obligations, especially tax-related financial obligations. Credit card bills from holiday spending, or perhaps a mid-winter vacation, arrive in mid to late January. RRSP contributions to be claimed on the 2017 return must be made on or before March 1, 2018. And, finally, the April 30, 2018 deadline for payment of any final balance of 2017 income taxes looms.

Last year, 85 percent of individual income tax returns filed were prepared and submitted online using one or the other of the Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) web-based tax filing services. There’s every reason to expect that the same percentages will apply this year, but there are some other options available to Canadian taxpayers.

While the obligation to file a T1 tax return form is an annual one, the process of completing that form and calculating tax payable is never exactly the same year to year. Change is the one constant in tax, as the federal and provincial governments are continually in the process of “fine-tuning” the tax system by eliminating some existing deductions and credits, changing others and, sometimes, implementing new ones.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.

If there is one invariable “rule” of financial and retirement planning of which most Canadians are aware, it is the unquestioned wisdom of making regular contributions to a registered retirement savings plan (RRSP). And it is true that for several decades the RRSP was only tax-sheltered savings and investment vehicle available to most individual Canadians.

One of the perennial New Year’s resolutions made by many individuals is a commitment to keep on a budget, spend less, save more, deal with any outstanding debt and, generally, to better manage their financial affairs. Fortunately, for those taxpayers (and for everyone else) the start of the new calendar year is also the start of a new tax year and with that, a fresh opportunity to contribute to one’s registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) and tax-free savings account (TFSA). What follows is an outline of the contribution limits and deadlines for both types of plans which will apply for the 2018 tax and calendar year.

Any taxpayer hearing of a tax planning opportunity that offered the possibility of saving hundreds or even thousands of dollars in tax while at the same time increasing his or her eligibility for government benefits, while requiring no advance planning, no expenditure of funds, and almost no expenditure of time could be forgiven for thinking that what was being proposed was an illegal tax scam. In fact, that description applies to pension income splitting which, far from being a tax scam, is a government-sanctioned strategy to allow married taxpayers over the age of 65 (or, in some cases, age 60) to minimize their combined tax bill by dividing their private pension income in a way which creates the best possible tax result.

Although it’s doubtful that anyone does so with any great degree of enthusiasm, each spring millions of Canadians sit down to complete their annual tax return for the previous calendar year or, more often, they pay someone else to do it for them. Although the rate of compliance among Canadian taxpayers is very high — for the last filing season, just under 30 million individual income tax returns were filed with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) — there are, inevitably, those who do not.

The Employment Insurance premium rate for 2018 is 1.66%.

The Canada Pension Plan contribution rate for 2018 is unchanged at 4.95% of pensionable earnings for the year.

Dollar amounts on which individual non-refundable federal tax credits for 2018 are based, and the actual tax credit claimable, will be as follows:

The indexing factor for federal tax credits and brackets for 2018 is 1.5%. The following federal tax rates and brackets will be in effect for individuals for the 2018 tax year.

Each new tax year brings with it a listing of tax payment and filing deadlines, as well as some changes with respect to tax planning strategies. Some of the more significant dates and changes for individual taxpayers for 2018 are listed below.

The federal government and each of the provinces (with the exception of Saskatchewan for 2018) and territories provide for indexing of individual income tax brackets and credit amounts. Changes other than indexation which will take effect for 2018 are listed below.

For most Canadians, registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs) don’t become top of mind until near the end of February, as the annual contribution deadline approaches. When it comes to tax-free savings accounts (TFSAs), most Canadians are aware that there is no contribution deadline for such plans, so that contributions can be made at any time. Consequently, neither RRSPs nor TFSAs tend to be a priority when it comes to year-end tax planning.

Just about any financial or investment transaction can now be carried out online, and many Canadians conduct most or all of their financial affairs in an online environment, whether through their financial institution’s web-based banking and investment services or by using mobile apps. The shift to managing one’s financial matters online has extended to dealing with income tax matters, and that’s a trend which has been both aided and encouraged by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

The fact that Canadian households are carrying a significant amount of debt — in fact, debt loads which seem to continually set new records — isn’t really news anymore. For several years, both private sector financial advisers and federal government banking and finance officials have warned of the risks being taken by Canadians who took advantage of historically low interest rates by continuing to increase their secured and unsecured debt.

News about another successful cyberattack, on government or on a private company, in a single country or worldwide, is now almost routine. What such events usually have in common is a desire by the hackers who perpetrate the attacks to profit by it — either by demanding payment from the entity whose systems have been compromised, or by obtaining confidential personal information (especially identifying or financial information) about individuals, which the hackers can then use fraudulently or sell to others who wish to do so.